CA:TWS, as a film, was a fantastic exercise in putting genuinely decent and optimistic characters (except for Steve himself, at this point, but we can go into that later) up against a nearly ripped-from-the-headlines plot that distills a lot of this country’s cynicism and negativity, particularly in my age group. More than any of the other MCU films, I think this was aimed directly at us, the people in our late teens and twenties and early thirties who sometimes start crying on the toilet because not only will we never be able to stop working our terrible service-industry jobs, we will also never be able to make a safe and comfortable world for the kids who come after us, or take care of our parents when they need us. On top of all that, we’re in this lame dystopian surveillance society where the government hates us, military force has taken the place of diplomacy and stuff like drone warfare is something we’re supposed to just accept, like it’s not horrifying. It’s a story specifically for my generation to try and find some solidarity with.

Which is a pretty ballsy play for a movie with a main character that’s 95.

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea saltGreen = organicsRed = dustWhite = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

jtotheizzoe:

One of my favorite GIFs of one of my favorite NASA visualizations to preview Monday’s It’s Okay To Be Smart and get you excited and all that jazz. Think you can guess what tomorrow’s vid is about?

Blue = sea salt
Green = organics
Red = dust
White = sulfates

Check out the full NASA video below, featuring simulated global “stuff in the air” over a two year period on Earth. Ain’t Earth beautiful? (Even if, as in this case, it’s a 3 million processor-hour computer animation)

omgplants:

!!!!!!!!!


Sophora prostrata (Kōwhai)

(Source: tabi-saki)

(Source: tiniestshorts)

romangod:

romangod:

It takes 10 books for Percy to realize Riptide can be used as an actual pen.

To clarify, Annabeth figured it out

speedwag:

ya hes cute but would he call out a transmysogynist

(Source: sandandglass)

ivechosengale:

I really don’t know know what it says about you if you read a trilogy about an oppressive government that starves its people and forces children to fight to the death in arenas and you spend your time villainizing Gale Hawthorne.

salvageearthtv:

Recycling Pic of the Day!
Photo courtesy: Melissa Hahn

salvageearthtv:

Recycling Pic of the Day!

Photo courtesy: Melissa Hahn

fefe-hake:

poly—nesian:

tiare-tipani:


While Australians face enormous challenges from climate change, put yourself in the shoes of those living on coral islands and atolls spread across the Pacific Ocean. For Pacific Islanders, land is life. Climate change is threatening this. It threatens families and the viability of islander communities and culture. The Pacific Island states of Tuvalu and Kiribati, situated north-east of Australia, and about half-way to Hawaii, are low-lying island nations experiencing some of the earliest and worst impacts of climate change.

"In the event that the situation is not reversed, where does the international community think the Tuvalu people are to hide from the onslaught of sea level rise? Taking us as environmental refugees, is not what Tuvalu is after in the long run.

We want the islands of Tuvalu and our nation to remain permanently and not be submerged as a result of greed and uncontrolled consumption of industrialized countries.

We want our children to grow up the way my wife and I did in our own islands and in our own culture.

Climate change is happening. The scientific consensus is that human activity is warming the Earth. This is changing weather patterns, increasing the frequency and intensity of severe weather events such as droughts, floods and cyclones and causing sea level rise – all of which impact on the ability of people in Kiribati and Tuvalu to find shelter, food and clean drinking water.

as my aunty said the other day, it’s not only your house that goes when it floods but it’s also your entire community, your language, your tikanga, your culture, and everything else you could imagine. these things are near impossible to bring back once they’re gone.